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20121202
20121202
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
the nature of the obama administration foreign policy is, paul. and susan rice in some ways encapsulates a strain in democratic policy thinking that goes way back, a story that's actually told by samantha power, a close aide to president obama and wrote about genocide in with a randa. and susan rice is state department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and not the president's mid ter
foreign- policy issues, we have moved our agenda and are focused on things domestic. we want to do a report on education. we do not want to repeat what everyone else has done. we want to look at education to the filter of national security and ask the question, what is the relationship between the challenges of k-12 education and the national security of the united states? it did not turn out to be a terribly hard selll. first she cursed me because she knew i had at that point. she was there. she and joel co-chaired this task force report, our version of the commission. the idea was to take people with disparate backgrounds, educators, people do not often come together in the same space, and essentially raise the question about what is the relationship between the educational challenges we face in the national security challenges we face? to recsast this issue. the fact that you are here reflects the fact that you are here at the risk of being redundant and redundant. what we wanted to do is get people who read foreign affairs rather than the chronicle of higher education. and jour
paid too little attention to this changing of the guard. what will their foreign policy look like? i have to great guests to shed light on all of that. welcome. liz. you have a very tough blog posting on the excellent counsel on foreign relations website which you say china's 18th party congress was a heartbreaker. it was a triumph of the conservative party. the candidate will the strongest credentials were left high and high. they took their place among the top seven. you see this as a real kind of reinstitution of a hard line conservative group. >> i do. i think this was a disappointing outcome from the 18th party congress. if you look at this leadership group they bring a wealth of experience to the table. collectively these seven men have governed roughly half the provinces. a number of them do have experience at the national level with the economy or political arena but by in large they are distinguish eed by their lack o distinction. none of them have been associated with an innovative program or policy reform on the economic or policy front. i think the fear in beijing is they
, we will fail to learn. if we don't change our strategy from a foreign policy point of view, bob, change this light footprint approach on the war on terror. there will be more benghazis. >> schieffer: thank you very much. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ >> schieffer: scrounge me the two chairs of congress' oversight committees, dianne feinstein, and. mike rogers who joins me from miami. you heard what lindsey graham said. he said this is getting to be more than what susan rice gave us an explanation. he said we're talking about a complete breakdown in the intelligence, in security, in everything concerning that benghazi mission. what's your take on that? >> well, i have reviewed all of the thre
and advisors are headed for the exits. who are the replacement and what impact on the foreign policy. doug has more for us in washington. >> foremost is who will replace hillary clinton as secretary of state? the white house signaled that un ambassador susan rice will be the choice . this week, the president voiced ut most confidence in her. >> susan rice is extraordinary . couldn't be prouder of a job done. >> also this week another republican senator expressed major doubts about rice not only about the bengazi terrorist attack but because of the africa section during the terrorist attack in the embassy in kenya when they pled for better security. susan collins teled the message to the administration about the secretary of state opening. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and easily confirmed by the colleagues. >> there are other key cabinet picks. secretary of the defense will have to contend with a destabilized middle east and rising threats from asia when big defense cuts are anticipated. former republican chuck ha gel of nebraska and ashton carter and michelle florino
because of a foreign policy decision. the wars weren't going to be fought. you aren't really saving money. it's a budget gimmick but it's not money you were going to spend. >> no, it's not a budget gimmick. the republicans propose it as a budget gimmick? >> sure, absolutely. >> then you should address it to them. >> but i'm addressing it to you. >> it's a basic challenge we face. this is the challenge we face which is how to bring the deficits down over time. it will require spending, savings and increase in rates and revenues. we think we can do that. we will work hard to do that and we have a good chance do it. no reason we can't do it. >> last question. can you promise we will not go over the cliff? >> no, i can't promise that. that's a decision that lies in the hands of the republicans that are now opposing increases in tax rates. if they recognize reality that we can't afford to extend those tax rates, then we have the basis for an agreement to be very good for the american people. >> and the president bears no responsibility, it's all up to the republicans? >> chris, and yourself th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)